Scylla CQL extensions

Scylla extends the CQL language to provide a few extra features. This document lists those extensions.

BYPASS CACHE clause

The BYPASS CACHE clause on SELECT statements informs the database that the data being read is unlikely to be read again in the near future, and also was unlikely to have been read in the near past; therefore no attempt should be made to read it from the cache or to populate the cache with the data. This is mostly useful for range scans; these typically process large amounts of data with no temporal locality and do not benefit from the cache.

The clause is placed immediately after the optional ALLOW FILTERING clause:

SELECT ... FROM ...
WHERE ...
ALLOW FILTERING          -- optional
BYPASS CACHE

“Paxos grace seconds” per-table option

The paxos_grace_seconds option is used to set the amount of seconds which are used to TTL data in paxos tables when using LWT queries against the base table.

This value is intentionally decoupled from gc_grace_seconds since, in general, the base table could use completely different strategy to garbage collect entries, e.g. can set gc_grace_seconds to 0 if it doesn’t use deletions and hence doesn’t need to repair.

However, paxos tables still rely on repair to achieve consistency, and the user is required to execute repair within paxos_grace_seconds.

Default value is equal to DEFAULT_GC_GRACE_SECONDS, which is 10 days.

The option can be specified at CREATE TABLE or ALTER TABLE queries in the same way as other options by using WITH clause:

CREATE TABLE tbl ...
WITH paxos_grace_seconds=1234

USING TIMEOUT

TIMEOUT extension allows specifying per-query timeouts. This parameter accepts a single duration and applies it as a timeout specific to a single particular query. The parameter is supported for prepared statements as well. The parameter acts as part of the USING clause, and thus can be combined with other parameters - like timestamps and time-to-live. In order for this parameter to be effective for read operations as well, it’s possible to attach USING clause to SELECT statements.

Examples:

	SELECT * FROM t USING TIMEOUT 200ms;
	INSERT INTO t(a,b,c) VALUES (1,2,3) USING TIMESTAMP 42 AND TIMEOUT 50ms;

Working with prepared statements works as usual - the timeout parameter can be explicitly defined or provided as a marker:

	SELECT * FROM t USING TIMEOUT ?;
	INSERT INTO t(a,b,c) VALUES (?,?,?) USING TIMESTAMP 42 AND TIMEOUT 50ms;